Election 2020 Politics

Where the candidates traveled in their final push before Super Tuesday

On the eve of Super Tuesday, former vice president Joe Biden held a blockbuster rally in Dallas where he showcased endorsements from former presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) and Beto O’Rourke.

Biden campaigned in Houston the same day, a sign that the candidate was trying to make up ground in Texas going into one of the most important days in the Democratic nominating process.

Public events in Super Tuesday states from Dec. 1 through March 2

Super Tuesday states

Sanders

in Boston

Feb. 29

Warren in

Los Angeles

March 3

Biden

in Dallas

March 3

Sanders

in Boston

Feb. 29

Warren in

Los Angeles

March 3

Biden

in Dallas

March 3

Super Tuesday states

Sanders

in Boston

Feb. 29

Warren in

Los Angeles

March 3

Biden

in Dallas

March 3

Super Tuesday states

Sanders

in Boston

Feb. 29

Warren in

Los Angeles

March 3

Biden

in Dallas

March 3

Super Tuesday states

To see which Super Tuesday states each of the remaining major candidates was focusing on, The Washington Post analyzed public events pulled from official Facebook pages, Mobilize candidate sites and Post reporting.

The analysis shows that Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has been the most active candidate in these parts of the country in 2020, visiting more than 20 cities in eight states that vote on March 3.

Sanders’s campaign is famous for its rallies, but candidates have also used smaller town halls and community gatherings to connect with their supporters. This analysis excluded private fundraisers and events where the candidate appeared remotely, such as through video chat. If the campaigns did not post the events online, or deleted them, they may have been omitted.


Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) campaigns in Salt Lake City on Monday. (Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

For much of the primary, the Democratic candidates were focused on the four early states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina, which all voted in February. Sanders, Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) held dozens of events in these states before shifting their focus to Super Tuesday, although Biden maintained the lowest profile of the three. Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg skipped the early states entirely.

South Carolina, the final early state, voted on Saturday. With little time to focus solely on Super Tuesday, the candidates had to plot their campaign paths judiciously.

Biden only visited five Super Tuesday states, but he has focused on the South following his major win in the Palmetto State. Before his Texas trip, he had two public appearances in Alabama and Virginia the weekend before Super Tuesday. Most of his public campaign with supporters has been led by his wife, Jill Biden.

Bloomberg has pursued an unusual campaign compared to the other candidates, and he is the only candidate to have held events in Tennessee since December, making five appearances. Voters across the nation have seen plenty of him though, thanks to the hundreds of millions of dollars he has spent on cable and digital advertising.

Warren’s schedule has been relatively light, targeting each of the most important states at least once. Her campaigning was limited in early 2020 because of Trump’s impeachment trial, when she was required to be in Washington for most of the week, as was Sanders. On Thursday she hosted a town hall in San Antonio, with former presidential candidate Julián Castro, who endorsed her campaign after dropping out the race.


Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar join the Rev. Al Sharpton as they march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 55th anniversary of brutal attacks on civil rights protesters in Selma, Ala., on Sunday. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post)

Sanders recently held a major rally in Boston, part of a nationwide push for delegates. He skipped the Deep South, and — like everyone else — hasn’t appeared in the New England states of Vermont and Maine, where he is already favored to win. Sanders did vote in Burlington on the day of the primary.

California and Texas, the biggest delegates hauls

California and Texas, with 415 and 228 delegates apiece, are the most important Super Tuesday states. They also are home to large Hispanic populations. As a result, they’ve been a special emphasis of the Sanders campaign.

Sanders has appeared in California 10 times since Dec. 1, asking for support in cities such as Los Angeles, San Jose and Santa Ana. In his California tour at the end of last year, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) supported him in a rally in the Venice neighborhood of Los Angeles. Biden and Bloomberg have appeared just once in the state.

Sanders was also the first candidate to travel to Texas this year, with a Feb. 14 rally in Mesquite, just outside of Dallas. Following his win in the Nevada caucuses, he immediately went on a major swing through the state.

Unfortunately for Sanders, California is notoriously slow at tabulating its vote, and Texas may also see delays. So it might take a while for anyone to know about any victories he has in the states, which could affect momentum going into the next round of primaries on March 10.

See a public event we missed? Please email us.

Reuben Fischer-Baum contributed to this report.

About this story: Data from Facebook, Mobilize candidate pages and Washington Post reporting. Only public events have been considered. Fundraising events (as most of them are private), live chats, kickoff calls and video calls are not included. Events in Super Tuesday states have been collected between Dec. 1 and March 2.

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